Tag Archives: moving

Downsizing 2.0

It’s time for another story of downsizing, this time the story of Judith.

Judith and I met a couple years ago when she came to a class I was teaching at the Phinney Neighborhood Association. The class was on the steps and process of selling a home. She came up to me after the class to talk about her situation. She owned a one-bedroom home in the Ravenna neighborhood of Seattle which she purchased as a foreclosure in 1975 for around $12,000. She and her partner Kurt were wanting to sell this home and downsize into a condo with no steps involved.  She mentioned that they had been looking at condos for around 15 years and hadn’t seen much that they liked. She was also concerned about the amount she would have to pay in capital gains taxes.

For the next year or two, we looked at a lot of condos, but given her budget and specific needs we weren’t finding anything she liked. This past February we did, and she submitted an offer on a Bitter Lake condo, but was outbid. We kept looking.

This summer she was encouraged to look at a lovely unit at the Sequoyah in Edmonds. She hadn’t wanted to leave Seattle but she was willing to look. While it was further away than she wanted, she had worked in Edmonds for many years so she was comfortable with the area. After seeing the condo and realizing it had everything she wanted and more, we submitted an offer and she got this unit.

She purchased the condo contingent on the sale of her house, so we had to immediately list. Many real estate brokers feel late August is not the time to bring a home on the market but we decided to do so anyway. Three days on the market and we had an offer significantly over list price.

The buyers of her home allowed for Judith to stay in the house for a couple months if needed. The condo she was buying would not be available until the end of September so Judith’s plan is to move in October. She was able to have her purchase funds sent directly from the first escrow company to the second escrow company. Judith has put aside enough funds to cover her estimated capital gains taxes.

For me as her real estate broker, I was so happy to help her move out of the house and into the condo. She loved her house and was sad to be leaving it but is very excited to be moving on with her life. These transactions involved of juggling, and that’s what I’m good at – I was able to ensure that both transactions closed without any issues.

Congratulations Judith and Kurt!

The transaction details.

House listed for sale August 24th for $590,000. 3 days on market. Sold for $617,000. Closed September 17th.

 

 

 

 

 

Condo purchase closed October 1st for $385,000.Condo purchase closed October 1st for $385,000.

I’m an SRES

What’s an SRES you may ask. It’s a Seniors Real Estate Specialist. As a SRES, I have received extensive education in working with people aged 50 and older in preparing and selling their home. I have the knowledge and expertise to counsel you through the major financial and lifestyle transitions involved in downsizing, relocating, and selling the home you have owned for decades. I offer you the opportunity to complete your real estate transaction with the patience, professionalism, and expertise you deserve.

For many people, they know it’s time to sell their home but the thought of moving and selling is overwhelming physically and emotionally. Here is where an SRES can step in and help. I have access to resources to help you with this major transition and will be there with you through all steps of the selling and moving process.

There are many reasons that you may be considering a move.

  • The cost of maintaining your home has become too high.
  • You want to be closer to your children and grandchildren.
  • Your home no longer meets your accessibility needs.
  • Your home is more home than you currently need.

Whether you’re looking to move to an active 55+ community, a senior-supported living situation, a smaller house, or a condo, I am here to help. I have worked with many sellers who have made such moves and understand how difficult this can be.

Give me a call at 206-790-0081 or email me at Jamie@JamieFlaxman.com and let’s talk about how I can be of help.

 

Moving Tips

 

 

 

 

 

I’m going to be putting together a handout on moving tips. There are so many steps to moving besides packing the boxes, from changes of address to preparing your new home for your pets.

This week I’m going to share the experience of a friend who moved recently. Don’t pack your important documents in a box – instead carry them with you!

This friend finished her move on a Saturday and then realized she was missing some boxes. She looked everywhere including driving back to her old place and could not find those boxes anywhere. The missing boxes included copies of her tax returns and boxes of checks, among other things. She was freaking out because if someone took her boxes, they might be able to steal her identity. Important documents such as credit cards, checks, financial records, passports, wills, etc. should be carried with you for the move, not placed in the truck.

My friend got lucky, someone found her boxes and put them in a safe place. She got them back unopened, after having a sleepless Saturday night.

Moral of the Story: Important documents such as credit cards, checks, financial records, passports, wills, etc. should be carried with you for the move, not placed in the truck. Also, inventory your boxes so you know how many went into the truck and how many came out.

Do you have a moving tip or story to share? Email it to Jamie@JamieFlaxman.com and it might make the Moving Tips Handout or show up on the Blog.

 

Downsizing Doesn’t Have to Be Daunting!

bookshelf-413705_1920Thinking of moving to a smaller space or even a tiny home? While it is true that by liberating ourselves of extra space can open the door to lower costs (mortgage, utilities, property taxes, and repairs), for many the thought of having to downsize their belongings in order to fit in more closed-quarters is prohibitive. If you have been thinking about downsizing, here are some ways you can get the ball rolling without it seeming overwhelming:

  • Lifestyle Analysis – First review how your life is going to change after you downsize. If you are retiring, there may be many work-related items that no longer need to clutter your closet! Suits, jackets, shoes, purses, etc., that served you in a professional capacity may be the first to go into the donate and sell If you are moving to a warmer climate, perhaps you should rethink your winter wardrobe. Moving to a condo and don’t plan on utilizing your green thumb? Consider your garden and lawn tools and supplies. Entire categories of things can be the first to go.
  • Space Analysis – Think about the space and functionality of the rooms you are moving to. If you don’t have a guestroom at your new place, then perhaps you don’t shouldn’t bring that entire room of items. If you are downsizing your kitchen to half of what you have now, then half of what you currently have will need to find another home. Think about your largest furniture pieces as well. Do you have room for a pool table? Also consider scale of furniture – sectionals and large dining room tables may be just too large proportionally for the rooms you will have.
  • Functionality Analysis – How many pans do you really cook with on a regular basis? How many mixing bowls do you really need at once? How many pairs of socks? So often we keep something around because we perceive that we need it, but you likely only use a few items in your home on a regular basis. When was the last time you made pasta from scratch or used all your towels? Downsizing means choosing, so choose wisely!
  • Memorabilia Analysis – This is a tough one because it means choosing among things that are cherished. Yearbooks, photos, letters, keepsakes, children’s artwork, etc., all fall into this category. As we get older, this problem becomes more pronounced as we inherit and become stewards of other people’s items. One idea is to digitize items – as files on a computer you still have the items but they take up less physical space. This category of items is just too painful for some people to have to go through and make choices for fear of making a mistake. If this sounds like you, then perhaps your best bet is to get a storage unit and put those items in there. I do recommend that you let someone else know about the unit in the event something happens to you so that these items stay in the family.

Are you overwhelmed by the thought of downsizing? Let’s talk! I would be happy to help get the ball rolling and I also have professional organizers I can call upon to help. (206) 790-0081 or email: Jamie@JamieFlaxman.com.